Storytiming

let readers grow!


2 Comments

Armchair Astronomy: Explore the Cosmos at the Library

This program has been a long time in the coming. But I’m struggling to write about it because it is so simple, I hardly think of it as a program idea. What is “armchair astronomy”, you ask? Think of it as astronomy storytime. I took a bunch of images from Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD for short), projected them on the big screen, and read the captions aloud. My first trial run of this program was on Saturday, and I had more than 40 people from oohing and aahing for nearly an hour. The best part is, it might be the easiest (and cheapest) programs I have ever put together.

The Source

APOD is arguably one of the most successful, long-running astronomy communication projects on the web. Founded in 1995 by two professional astronomers Robert Nemiroff of Michigan Technical University and Jerry Bonnell of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, APOD invites average joe’s like you and me to “Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.” Today, the APOD archive contains the largest collection of annotated astronomical images on the internet. I’ve had a daily APOD habit for a long time. At first, I looked more than I read. The images are breathtaking. It’s often hard to take your eyes off them long enough to notice that words beneath. But it’s the words that connect the wonder your eyes take in with the understanding your curious brain needs. The captions describe–in brief, accessible detail–what the images show. And they are every bit as beautiful as the images. Take this one posted on January 10, 2014:

The description begins, "A mere seven hundred light years from Earth, in the constellation Aquarius, a sun-like star is dying."

The description begins, “A mere seven hundred light years from Earth, in the constellation Aquarius, a sun-like star is dying.”

I’ve been “collecting” my favorite first lines from novels since I was 12, and this caption rivals everything in my top 100. And this is just one of thousands of APOD entries. Every single one of these images (whether the image is beautiful or not) is supported by a small, yet profound grain of scientific knowledge. It’s amazing how digestible esoteric subjects like astronomy, cosmology, and astrophysics are when served in bite-sized pieces. And that’s what makes APOD an incredible tool for learning. That is what made me realize this program would work. In storytime, we guide young children through stories made up of both images and words that when delivered simultaneously, lead them to greater understanding of new ideas and experiences. I began to think I could apply the storytime model to astronomy, and create an engaging learning experience for people of all ages in my library.

The Program

This program is ridiculously simple. In fact, I’d say it falls firmly in the Unprogramming Model developed my one of my favorite librarian duos:   and Amy Koester. I projected an assortment of my favorite images onto a big screen, and read the informative captions aloud. Here is the slideshow: 

Each one of the images used can be found in the APOD archive by searching by the date that appears on the slide. Following the presentation, I showed two of my favorite down-to-earth science lectures ever: 

and

Finally, I collected a ton of materials: books and DVDs from all three departments, and put them on display. I made best-of lists in our patron-side catalog (yay bibliocommons).

That’s All Folks!

It really doesn’t get much more simple than that. At the end, we had a quick Q&A. The primary question on everyone’s mind was, “when are you doing this again?” And isn’t that what every librarian wants to hear? What’s more I have a group of 10 patrons ranging from age 7-41 who want to start a Citizen Science club so that we can participate in Zooniverse projects as a group at the library. I am really very excited about this idea. I’m going to put a workshop on the calendar for the fall.  I wish I could start this right away, but we plan programs really far in advance. Sadly, it’s too late to start something in the summer. So even if you know nothing about astronomy, give “Armchair Astronomy” a try.  It’s a great way to explore the universe at the library. I am thinking of turning this into a series. After all, I have a huge number of images I cut from this presentation. I could easily do this as a monthly drop-in program. So give it a try, my little starlings! It’s #Easypeasylemonsqueezy.


Leave a comment

Hack This Infographic Story Stretcher: What’s the Magic Word?

This week’s infographic was not a huge success.

A great storytime book for 4s and 5s!

What’s the Magic Word by Kelly DiPucchio is one of my all time favorite storytime books, but I should have known this story would not go over as well with toddlers. It’s too sophisticated, and perhaps a bit too scary, for this age group. But I wanted to post it anyway for two reasons: 1) it needs some tweaking, but I don’t know what those tweaks entail. I could use some ideas (hint, hint); and 2) toddlers are my main audience, so this infographic won’t see much action if I neglect to share it. Feel free to hack this infographic. In fact, I will upload all the images I used tomorrow when I get to the library tomorrow.

But for now, here’s my version: What’s the magic word


3 Comments

New Things Going On: Niles Buzz Blog

My library’s website underwent a redesign in the fall of 2013. The Niles Buzz is last phase of that redesign, and it rolled out at the end of the year.  Before the redesign, each department had its own blog, and did it’s own thing. The redesign consolidated the various department blogs into a single, library-wide blog.

I’m the editor of the KidSpace section, but I’ve been given free range to write non-YS librarian posts as well. It’s been many years since my Punk Planet days, and my editorial muscles are a little stiff. But I’m always excited to jump into new projects. I’ll get back in the groove soon (I hope). Plus, it will give me a chance to extend my library work beyond the birth-to-tween set. After all, I do spend a portion of my day thinking about things other than picture books and flannel boards. Admittedly, it’s a pretty small portion, but whatever.

This first post isn’t so far a stretch: Let’s Talk About Chores, Baby!


10 Comments

Flannel Friday Follow-Up: Hi, Pizza Man Infographic

UPDATE!!!

Here is the PDF of the Hi, Pizza Man infographic: Hi Pizza Man

Last week I tried an experiment with my toddler time group, and wrote this post: Infographic Story Stretchers.

Yesterday, I had an opportunity to follow up on last weeks experiment. Guess what? It was a big success!!

1) My toddler time parents gave me wonderful feedback, and were eager to collect this week’s infographic (Hi, Pizza Man by Virginia Walter).

I was thrilled to hear that everyone said they used them to retell the stories together later that day. And many even said used them several times throughout the week. Two parents said they used the infographics talk about their day with daddies during dinner. Three said they used it to retell the Little Miss Muffet at bedtime. One parent said her daughter has been reenacting the Little Miss Muffet story all week. She laughed and said, “Poor Little Miss Muffet can’t get home because she keeps running into hippos, elephants, dinosaurs, mummies,” and my favorite, “draculas.”

In last week’s post, I forgot to mention that I gave each parent a folder to keep their infographic, as well as a copy of the library newsletter and some flyers for upcoming events. Well, this week two parents actually remembered to bring the folders  this week so they would have a safe way to collect a new infographic. And the rest of the parents said they know exactly where their folders are because they’ve been using it all week. (YAY!)

All in all, I would say that the experiment was a success! Not only will I continue to make infographics for my storytimers this session, but I also hammered out the format to make this a clear-cut task.

Each storytimer received a folder to take home, two infographics (so far), and an envelope for wrangling the small pieces:

Each storytimer received a folder to take home, two infographics (so far), and an envelope for wrangling the small pieces.

An Infographic Story Stretcher kit

And finally, this week’s infographic is based on my all-time favorite storytime book: Hi, Pizza Man. 

photo (1)

The first page is as you see if above, and the second is a bunch of little doors. I printed the first page 20 times, and the second page once. Then I cut up all the little doors.  Each storytimer gets one infographic and one door. At the end of storytime I passed them out, and demonstrated how to use it later to retell the story later.

I just realized I forgot to send myself the PDF, so I will post it tomorrow.

The magnificent Mel Depper is hosting this week’s special Valentine’s Day Flannel Friday. And it just so happens that we are coming upon the third anniversary of this wonderful tradition. So big XOXOXO’s for Mel. Thanks for hosting!


8 Comments

Flannel Friday: Infographic Story Stretchers

This morning I woke up with a weird idea: replace traditional handouts with a picture book infographic.

So a little background…When I was a new librarian, I was a storytime handout maniac. I made tons of carefully researched handouts with rhymes, booklists, fingerplays, etc. I even put a coloring page on the b-side in the hopes they would end up on a few fridges. But at the end of the day, the handouts would end up scattered all over children’s department and parking lot. Eventually, I stopped making them. I dip into my files sometimes; but to tell you the truth, I’ve never had a single parent ask about them when they weren’t offered.

So what’s a picture book infographic?

Well, since this is my first attempt at such a thing, I don’t want to define it too strictly. Let’s just say, it’s a graphic representation of a picture book or story. The trick is fitting the entire story into a single image. Unlike with a flannel board, where you have several pieces that you use to build the story on a canvas, an infographic uses a single visual representation that kids (and parents) can use to recall and retell the story in their own words.

I think it’s important to note that this is not intended to replace reading the story in any way, shape, or form. I don’t think a story stretcher infographic works on it’s own. It is intended to support the development of narrative skills and memory. It is meant to build on the shared stories and experiences. So read the book. Purchase multiple copies! And build some serious love for your favorite picture books using infographics!

Infographic Show & Tell

I chose a story I knew would fit this format:

little miss

Trapani has written a bunch of books that riff on classic nursery rhymes. I love them. It’s a brilliant idea: take story so familiar that it practically loses all meaning, and ask “then what happened?” For example

Little Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey
Along came a spider
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away.

In Trapani’s version, Miss Muffet tries to hide from the spider, only to run into a mouse. She flees the mouse, and runs into a frog, a crow a fish, and finally… A MOOSE! Yes, a goddamn moose. How brilliant is that? Very brilliant.

Follow Little Miss Muffet through her ordeal.

Follow Little Miss Muffet through her ordeal.

I had a very little time to slap this experiment together. I did a google image search for game board template and found something awesome: Snappy the Snapping Syllable Turtle. This game is adorable as is, makes a great activity for a passive program. It was also the perfect image for an infographic of LMM. It even had the tree and the pond in the right places; so I hacked it.

Next, I scattered clipart “scary critters” in the order they appeared in the story. Then I found an image of Little Miss Muffet, and made a little game piece out of her.

At the end of storytime I passed them out, and demonstrated how to use it later to retell the story later today or this week. Since this was an experiment, I also asked them to report: “Did you use it? And if so,  was it worthwhile? Was it fun?”

Please feel free to download this Little Miss Muffet handout Little Miss Muffet Infographic. It’s a two-page pdf. Page one is the infographic, and page two is page of 20 Little Misses. Print page one 20x, but page two only once. I printed page one on cardstock, so it would hold up the moving around a bit, but crappy paper would be fine.  I am going to try to come up with more infogenic (did I just invent a word?)

Some that come to mind:

  • Hi, Pizza Man!
  • Pete’s a Pizza
  • Fall is not Easy
  • We’re Going on a Bear Hunt
  • Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus
  • Katie Loves The Kittens
  • Tip Tip Dig Dig
  • Joseph had a Little Overcoat
  • I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More
  • Bark, George
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar

OMG! Like every good storytime book ever. I am going to start on next week’s infographic right away!

Kathryn is hosting the #FFRU at Fun with Friends at Storytime Thanks Kathryn!

 


4 Comments

Pharrell’s “Happy” is the Best Storytime Song Ever!

I woke up feeling wild and crazy this morning. I woke up excited to try something new in storytime. My husband and I have been listening to this song and awful lot:

We haven’t made through all 24 hours of the epic 24-Hours of Happy. But we’ve been chopping away bit by bit, and the shine hasn’t worn of so far.  The song irresistible.  And I’ve always said I could watch people doing silly dances all day long, but I never thought someone would take this statement so literally. So, I am going out on a limb to say: thanks Pharrell! You are sublime. You are quite possibly the greatest living artist of our time.

Anyway, I was driving into work this morning. I was excited about storytime, and decided to play this song, to prep my brain. Suddenly, I had a crazy idea:

Then I decided to test out a new thing in storytime: take a dance break, and rock out in the middle of storytime. I played Happy. We all danced, and got silly.

I think I will try it again next week. In fact, to give the dance break a little more structure, I will bring rhythm sticks. I admit, some of the caregivers in my storytime prefer “conventional” activities. They may have looked a little ill at ease during this activity, but it only lasted a couple of minutes. Then it was on to the normal stuff.Then during playtime the room was filled with toddlers say “happy”…”happy”… “happy”, all over the place.

Anyway, I highly recommend doing the same. It is awesome!


1 Comment

Flannel Friday: Reno(vation) 911!

File this under #thingsididntlearninlibraryschool.  My library is in the final of a top-to-bottom renovation. My department, rebranded as KidSpace, has been this final phase. It’s been a roller coaster ride, and I am not sad that it’s coming to an end. And it looks awesome! I will post a full report once it is complete.

I have one piece of advice for librarians who are going through a big renovation project: Expect the unexpected. When it does (and it will), keep calm, and think on your feet. I guess that’s actually 2 or 3 pieces  of advice.

Today around 2:30, we received an unexpected delivery: a giant white board. We didn’t even know this was coming. It arrived at 3 (yes on a Friday), along with a stern warning from our Maintenance Supervisor (who btw strikes an imposing figure) that it was very important to keep a keen eye on little ones with markers in their hands.  We have some magnets, but not enough to cover this bohemoth.

I went to Kidzclub.com and downloaded a whole bunch of their printable  versions of storytime classics and made magnet boards. I set up the magnet boards, and grabbed copies of the books from our collection, so they would have the text to go along with the pieces. So very last minute, and I didn’t have quite enough time to finish all the stories I wanted to do, or create a big display. I sent out an email, so hopefully someone can finish up for me over the weekend, or I can finish on Monday.  Here are some pictures:

Say hello to my white whale.

Say hello to my white whale.

The moral of the story is: when the going gets tough, the tough librarians get magnets!

The wise and talented Lisa of Libraryland is hosting this week. Thanks Lisa!

Happy Flannel Friday!


Leave a comment

Flannel Friday Facebook Request: Books about Friendliness

Amanda of Trails & Tails recently posted this request on the Flannel Friday facebook page: “What are your favorite picture books of being friendly?”

Here is a list of my 137 favorite books about friendliness and being a good friend: PBs about Friendliness.


1 Comment

Flannel Friday: There’s a Rabbit

Hey two Flannel Fridays in a row–I’m almost on a roll!

This is an adorable piggyback+prop song for toddler times. The best part is you probably have the supplies in an odds-and-ends drawer somewhere. All you need is some sort of small basket and some sort of rabbit toy.

I found it in my new favorite book from our teacher collection, More Than Singing: Discovering Music in Preschool and Kindergarten by Sally Moomaw.

Image

It’s a fun way to explore concepts like inside, on top, behind, etc.

There’s a Rabbit (tune: “Put Your Finger on Your Nose”)
There’s a rabbit in his hutch, in his hutch.
There’s a rabbit in his hutch, in his hutch.
Oh, I think he might be hungry and he’s looking for his lunch.
There’s a rabbit in his hutch, in his hutch.

Image

Cheers, dears!


3 Comments

Flannel Friday: Clip Clop Halloween Hack

I’m a little late for this to be useful for Halloween 2013, but here’s a little story I cooked up for Boo Time (My library’s annual Halloween program for little ones).

clipclop

Clip Clop by Nicola Smee is one of my all-time favorite storytime books. I know many #FFers has made flannel boards of this story. I decided to adapt the idea for Halloween. I replaced all the animals with Halloween-themed characters: horse-witch, cat-ghost, dog-mummy, pig-devil, duck-vampire.

roombroom

The only change I had to make to the text is I switched the onomatopoeia from “clip-clop clippity-clop” to “swish swoosh swishily swoosh”. The bootimers ate it up like, well candy!

Happy Belated Halloween!